India supported the UN resolution on a clean and healthy environment, but also expressed some concerns

India supported the UN resolution on a clean and healthy environment, but also expressed some concerns

India has voted in favor of the resolution to recognize the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment as a human right in the United Nations General Assembly. However, expressing concern over the procedure and substance of the resolution of the proposal, it has recused itself from the relevant paragraph-1. The resolution was passed with 161 votes in the 193-member General Assembly on Thursday. During this time China, Russia, Belarus, Iran, Syria, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Kyrgyzstan distanced themselves from the proposal.

Ashish Sharma, Adviser to India's Permanent Mission to the United Nations General Assembly, said that India is always ready to strive for a better environment. But the proposal does not explain the fundamental principle of equality in international environmental law. That's why India is worried about it.

Sharma said that in paragraph one of the resolution, it is written that the Mahasabha recognizes the right to a clean, healthy, and sustainable environment as a human right. He said that this statement should be included in the official record. The resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly are not binding by themselves. It is only for those who are committed to a new human right.

At the same time, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, has also welcomed the proposal, calling it historic.

According to operational paragraph 1 of the resolution, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) "recognizes the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment as a human right."

He requested that this statement be included in the official record of the meeting. Ashish Sharma stressed that the UNGA resolution does not prescribe any binding obligation and binds the member states to fulfill it only through conventions and treaties.

Ashish Sharma said, “There is no clear understanding and definition of the words ‘clean’, ‘healthy’ and ‘everlasting’ on which everyone agrees. At present, everyone has made up their own definitions, and thus defeats the purpose of recognition declared in the present resolution.